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Cornell Corner

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Update on Cornell tests on 3/16” maple tubing

By Stephen Childs NYS Maple Specialist |

During the 2014 maple season the Cornell Maple Program conducted three demonstration sites using 3/16” maple tubing. Each demonstration site was set up in the month of February and tapped the last week of February. The first sap run occurred on March 10th. The demonstrations were set up to compare sap yield from a new 5/16” lateral line with 8 taps using 5/16” standard black check valve spouts on new 5/16” drop lines with sap yield from a new 3/16” lateral line with 8 taps using 5/16” standard black check valve spouts on a new 5/16” drop lines for 8 inches then fitted to 3/16” drop line.
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How joint marketing can help the maple industry

Michael Farrell |

At the most recent meeting of the International Maple Syrup Institute and North American Maple Syrup Council in Nova Scotia, the IMSI brought in Ellen LaNicca to speak about joint marketing efforts in the agricultural sector. MORE ]

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Highlights from 2014 Natural Products EXPO East

By Michael L. Farrell |

This September I had the fortunate opportunity to attend Natural Products EXPO East, one of the largest trade shows in the country focused on natural foods and related items. MORE ]

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Factors that influence crystal size in maple products

Stephen Childs |

A very important factor in making quality maple value added products is to size sugar crystals so the product feels great to the customers’ mouth. For some products such as maple candy and maple cream a very smooth mouth feel is preferred by most customers. If making maple granulated maple sugar a grainier texture is preferred. Unfortunately it is much easier to make grainy textured creams and candies than smooth textured due to the extra attention required to make sure a smooth texture is accomplished. MORE ]

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Weighing pros, cons of producing birch syrup

Michael Farrell |

Although many sugarmakers have heard that you can tap birch trees, very few of us have actually tried to produce birch syrup, and folks who have boiled down some birch sap have mostly had negative experiences. The sugar content of birch is much lower than maple sap (usually between .5-1 brix), so it takes a very long time to boil it down, especially when it’s done on a small scale without efficient processing technologies. MORE ]

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Determining the value of sap you produce

Michael Farrell |

In the previous issue of The Maple News, I submitted an article summarizing the research carried out by the Parker Family Maple Farm comparing the differences in their yields and profitability when utilizing different combinations of spouts and droplines.
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Limiting conservative tapping guidelines

Brian Chabot, Cornell Maple Program |

The article by Abby Van Den Berg et al (Maple News November 2013) provides valuable research support for understanding the key variables behind tapping guidelines. Prior to 2005 there was no research supporting any of the guidelines in use. However, maple producers need to pay careful attention to the caveats mentioned in the article MORE ]

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Mainline sizing guidelines and worksheets for 1” line

Stephen Childs, NYS Maple Specialist |

The number of taps that can be properly supported on a one inch mainline depends on a number of factors including the line loss due to friction in the line, the length of the line, the slope of the line, sap volume in the line and vacuum capacity available to the line. MORE ]