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Some confusion over IPA usage

Various Contributors | March 2016

Increased attention to spout and tubing sanitization has led to rising sap yields for maple producers. Cleaning and replacement (use of new spouts, use of Check-valve spouts or adapters, or replacing spouts and droplines) strategies have different effects on sap yields, and each carry their own costs in terms of supplies and labor to implement the various approaches, and thus each has a different net profit. MORE ]

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Recent trends in the maple industry III - changes in sap yield

Timothy D. Perkins, M.L. Isselhardt and A.K. van den Berg |

This series of articles has described the changes in the U.S. maple industry over the past 15-20 years. We have witnessed an era of tremendous growth in production, much of it coming about due to the addition of taps. Utilizing the data collected by the U.S.D.A. National Agricultural Statistics Service, it is easy to see that one of the more striking changes though has been the increases in the quantity of sap per tap (sap yield) that producers are now able to collect. MORE ]

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Recent trends in the maple industry II: U.S. expansion

Timothy D. Perkins, M.L. Isselhardt and A.K. van den Berg |

This second series installment focuses on expansion in the maple industry over the past ten years. We will primarily rely upon the 2012 U.S.D.A. Census of Agriculture (COA) as a basis for our information. In addition, although growth is evident in many maple-producing areas, we will focus primarily on the six top producing states, NH, PA, OH, ME, NY and VT, as these account for over 85% of the syrup made in the U.S.
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What's trending

By Timothy D. Perkins, M.L. Isselhardt and A.K. van den Berg |

This second series installment focuses on expansion in the maple industry over the past ten years. We will primarily rely upon the 2012 U.S.D.A. Census of Agriculture (COA) as a basis for our information. In addition, although growth is evident in many maple-producing areas, we will focus primarily on the six top producing states, NH, PA, OH, ME, NY and VT, as these account for over 85% of the syrup made in the U.S.
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Tech helped boost yields in last decades

By Timothy D. Perkins, M.L. Isselhardt and A.K. van den Berg |

Pure maple syrup is a uniquely North American food product that is marketed worldwide. The last few decades have witnessed tremendous changes in the maple syrup industry in the U.S. and Canada. Production of syrup and marketing of syrup have risen dramatically, especially over the past decade. MORE ]

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Maple water: A first look

By Timothy Perkins, Abby van den Berg and Mark Isselhardt |

Drinking tree sap is common in several areas of the world, but is far less practiced in North America. Several new maple-sap derived beverages have been introduced into the consumer market and prominently featured in news articles over the past year.
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Birch can help increase your maple operation profits

By Abby van den Berg, Timothy Perkins and Mark Isselhardt |

Birch syrup production is similar to maple syrup production – it uses mostly maple equipment (spouts, buckets or tubing, evaporators, etc.), and the spring sapflow season begins just as the maple season is ending. MORE ]

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Aesthetics of sap collecting

Tim Wilmot, UVM Extension  |

Each year many new people try their hand at sugaring, and discover how satisfying it is to share syrup made with their own hard work. Most sugarmakers take great pride not only in their syrup, but in the entire process of maple production. Remember that whether you produce 2 gallons or 2000, you represent the maple industry to the public. You are making a specialty food product that is pure and natural, and your maple operation should reflect this fact. It is important to set a standard that gives the public confidence in your operation, even if it is very small.
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